Thoughts · Traditional Values

Young Adults: The Case For Staying Home

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If there’s anything I’ve definitely objected to as a part of modern Western culture through the years consistently –

– it’s the wasteful notion of living by yourself as a social cue.

Now, I’ve had friends who had to leave home because of terrible situations, especially with family and those are all fully justifiable. It’s not an easy spot and it’s better to be in a safe, supportive place where you can be yourself, even if it’s financially more of a challenge. There’s also work/university reasons. All necessary.

Though if you’re moving out just because you’re old enough or it just ‘looks bad’, that’s no reason to be wasting rent money. A common modern complaint I hear is that millennial are choosing to staying at home and living with parents for longer.

Good.

Look at almost any Asian/immigrant household with young adult children, nearly all of them live at home until they get married and guess what?
These are the young adults who can afford a house sooner, have a bigger savings account and a better support system within their family. Why?
Because it’s the financially sensible thing to do. Not to spend more money just to fulfil social norms.

Obviously, if you’re some neckbeard who isn’t working, studying, contributing to the household and leeching off your parents – shame. On. You. That’s a completely different matter and the epitome of a lack of motivation and work ethic.

I’m talking about young adults or adults (in your 20s) who have a job, are putting away the extra money they’re not spending on rent while helping to support their family household. As you can guess, I am one of these people and it’s been a wonderful time, having my family around (who I get along with really well) while having more to save. I have a mate who recently tried living alone, house-sitting for our other friend, reporting the opposite to me. It was lonely, quiet and she was constantly tempted to buy things or spend money going out to keep herself occupied in her free time.

I managed to convince her to just call me so we could chat and just relax within our respective dwellings. Soon enough, she went right back to living with her family, who’s happy to have her until she’s married.

That’s what happens when you’re mostly alone, I had mentioned this before in a different post but I’ll say it again. When you don’t have a close support network that you live with (close friends, a spouse or family), you’re more vulnerable to marketing and stress/impulse buys (materialism in general, really) since there’s barely anyone there to give a second opinion. To bounce ideas off when you get a passing fancy for an ad or product. You’re also trying to fill that hole caused by isolation or loneliness.

All for the sake to say you’re ‘all independent and on your own’ in the world?

Not worth it.

I mean this for both men and women. For men, as more of the provider and protector, later on you might want to consider living by yourself or using what you’ve saved from living with family to prepare for one of your own (whether you want to buy or rent, etc). Though earlier on? Not so necessary. As for women, it’s great practice for looking after a family unit if you’re helping to look after many family members.

It really makes me shake my head when you see millions and potentially billions of dollars all going to estate agents and well-off landlords that aren’t really necessary. All those dollars could be for a future home, for long-term rent for a family, for an investment.
Instead, they’re going away into a wisp of air that you’ll never see again.

Make it easier for yourself.
If you can, stay at home.

Don’t listen to those who throw hundreds of dollars away regularly for social status and nothing more.

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